CLOS DE GAT | Har’el | Syrah | Judean Hills | 2014
syrah

CLOS_DE_GAT_Harel_Syrah_Judean_Hills_2014

We will be evaluating wines in no particular order on no particular schedule. Just stay tuned and you will never miss our reviews. If the wine is tasted more than once, the rating table will be updated so as to reflect all the new impressions and observations.

Today we are going to review a quite unique wine – Har’el Syrah Judean Hills 2014 by Clos de Gat. This is a single varietal syrah wine that has been produced with grapes from vineyard sites around the Judean Mountains, bordering Israel’s biblical Ayalon Valley, where Joshua defeated the Five Kings. An ancient “Gat” (Hebrew for wine press), pre-dating the Roman period by a thousand years, is located in the heart of the vineyards, hence the name of the domain ‘Clos de Gat’. Har’el (which translates as ‘Mountain of God’) is 100% syrah, made with handpicked grapes that are fermented in open tanks. After ageing for 16 months in 30% new, French oak barrels and racked every 4-6 months, the final blend is bottled without filtering. In a world where bolder is better, syrah is the perfect choice, as it is darker and spicier than cabernet sauvignon and contains a high amounts of health-invigorating antioxidants. But enough with all that theory – without further ado, let’s take a look at the wine tasting results.
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Take a look at the tasting notes below and our detailed assessment of the wine:
CLOS_DE_GAT_Harel_Syrah_Judean_Hills_2014_review

sight
//Visual
concentration: deep & opaque
colour: garnet
clarity: hazy
hue/rim: garnet

compound
//Olfactory

intensity: powerful
fruit profile: red fruits & black fruits
__red fruits: sour cherry | dried cherry
__black fruits: black cherry | black plum | blackcurrant
fruit character: overripe

//Flavor
non fruit: spice | oak | animal | earth
__spice: black pepper | nutmeg
__oak: vanilla | liquorice | tobacco
__animal: veal | leather | musk
__earth: salt | black soil | dust
__wood: old & new /  light & medium
aroma: primary | secondary | tertiary

graph
//Palate
sweetness: dry
acidity: med(+)
alcohol: med(+)
tannin: med(+)
__grip: ripe
body: full
balance: good
__dominant: acidity & alcohol
complexity: complex

//Taste
fruit profile: red fruits & black fruits
fruit character: overripe & dried
non fruit: spice | oak | earth
finish: med(+)
aftertaste: velvety

rate
//Scoring
CLOS DE GAT | Har’el | Syrah | Judean Hills | 2014

variety: syrah
country: Israel
region: Judean Hills
rating: 92.7

//Conclusion
maturity: in its prime
verdict: great
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96x96This is definitely a great wine of Israel and, with a total of 92.7 points scored, this wine is right there, among the best wines we’ve rated so far. Check our complete database on the wine rating page, where you can find all the wines that we have tasted and reviewed or go to the about us page and find out more about our exquisite rating system.

Verdict: this is a very fine syrah wine that is made in a clear-cut old-world style – fruit-forward and spicy, yet savory and leathery – definitely one of the best we’ve reviewed so far – a wine that is still developing into the bottle, therefore we would advocate for 2 or 3 more years of bottle ageing. The wine tastes supple, round and noble, with fine-grained tannins and mouth-watering acidity. This is a complex and well structured syrah wine, with a full body and well integrated alcohol. As we’ve already mentioned before, older wines develop more complex and less fruity flavours, where a fully mature wine can offer an explosion of amazingly nuanced scents that are virtually impossible to name – which is a pure, hedonistic pleasure.
CLOS_DE_GAT_Harel_Syrah_Judean_Hills_2014_profilex_the_color___________________________________________________________________________
© The WineStatistics ratings are based solely on our own knowledge of the world of wine and on our personal wine tastes, which may, or may not, differ from yours – the reader. Just remember that there are no absolutes of right and wrong in wine appreciation.

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